Wholesale Salvage Merchandise: A Definition

Wholesale salvage merchandise is a product category used in the wholesale and closeout business to refer to merchandise that has either been damaged, or has been exposed to a situation in which the potential for damage is high. Salvage is a term that was first used to refer to products that were transported on trains that derailed. For instance, if a train was transporting a container of electronics, and a derailment took place, the insurance company would pay the owner of the load for the damaged electronics. The insurance company would then take possession of the damaged merchandise and dispose of it through wholesale channels. A salvage buyer primarily purchases inventory that could have become distressed due to an accident, fire, or flood. While the salvage buyer can purchase this type of inventory for literally pennies of the original wholesale cost, he must sort the products out and try to repair any damaged merchandise.

The salvage category is appropriate for a retailer that has access to consumers that can tolerate slightly damaged merchandise in exchange for the implicit savings. A salvage reseller should consider purchasing items where the potential for damages is diminished. For example, a television has a much greater change of being damaged if a truck transporting it crashes, than a pair of jeans would. And because it is much easier to sew clothing than it is to repair general merchandise, most experienced salvage buyers will prefer to focus on apparel, and soft goods for that matter. Because of the nature of this wholesale category, it is imperative that buyers inspect the goods in person, so that they can ascertain what percentage of the inventory can be sold as is, and the cost involved in repairing any damaged items. If an inspection is not possible, the buyer would want to obtain a low enough price that will mitigate his risk in making a purchase sight unseen.

What Is A Salvage Grocery Store?

A salvage grocery store specializes in selling off products sent back to the grocery warehouse by a store or excess inventory sold to a liquidator by a manufacturer. Sometimes the stores are called scratch and dent stores, dented can stores or discount grocery stores.

Sometimes undamaged grocery items become salvage because their use by date was getting close, or because the item just didn’t sell well in that area. Hot Peppers may sell well in New Mexico and Texas, but not so well in New England. Sometimes the reason the item becomes salvage is seasonal. Lots of Halloween stuff shows up in November, and Christmas stuff shows up in January. Sometimes it’s a misspelled label or a product overrun. In any case, all the groceries are checked for quality by the liquidation center and by our staff at Discount Groceries and More.

Where do salvage groceries come from?

Accidents happen, even in the grocery business. If a case of green beans gets dropped, or hit by a forklift and a couple of cans get bent, those cans (and sometimes the whole case) don’t make it to the grocery store shelves. Instead, they’re sent to a reclamation center, where broken jars are discarded, cans with leaks are destroyed, etc. The rest of the products (the good stuff) are then shipped to a distributor, who then ships the salvage grocery products to a salvage grocery store.

What kind of stuff will you find at a salvage grocery store?

To really sum it up, a salvage (discount) grocery is a place where you will always find unexpected treasures. This week there may be an awesome deal on something that’s not there next week. You may be the one who picks up the last bag of the gourmet coffee for a song or not. You’ll find name brand cereals with a crunched corner or a packing knife cut on a box but still a bargain for $1.49. The big box stores can’t sell you the box with a crunched corner for $5.00 so they ship it off to an liquidator who puts together pallet loads of these groceries to sell to retailers across the country.

Usually you’ll be talking to the owner of the store or their friendly helper. No big city rush here like in the Wal-Mart or at the big box stores. Need help, just ask.

Salvage grocery stores are regulated and inspected by the USDA. This means each owner is cognizant on what can be sold and what can’t be sold. We are taught how recognize foods that are or are not safe.

What about foods that are past the Best if used by date?

The Best if used by date is the date recommended for best taste or flavor. This is how long the manufacturer wants their goods on display but usually foods will be good for, in some cases, many months beyond these dates. If most of us would check our shelves and pantries, we’d find that we’ve been eating many foods which technically have expired without knowing it.

They only foods required to have expiration dates are baby foods and infant formulas.

Auto Salvage Yards Will Help You Save!

Searching for the right parts for your car? Look no further than your local auto salvage yard! Auto salvage yards take in all types of vehicles that no longer work and reuse the salvageable pieces in working cars. If these parts still run great, why have them sent off to a landfill when they could be the answer to your car problems?

Did you know that, on average, three quarters of an inoperable car’s parts can be reused because they are still in working condition? An auto salvage yard could have just the pieces you’re looking for! Even small, locally owned salvage yards can have a few thousand cars’ worth of parts on hand. That’s over a million parts! And not only is it likely that they’ll have the parts you need, but some places will also install the parts for you on-site. Some salvage yards also encourage you to call ahead with the description of the part you need so that they can pull it from the yard and have it ready for you when you arrive. This saves you time AND money!

Some other tips for ensuring a good buying experience include:

1) Check and see if the business has a 100% money-back guarantee! If the part is not performing up to standard, will you get your money back?

2) If you do not have a salvage yard near you, or if you do not want to travel out to one, will the business ship the part to you? Be sure to compare the price of the used part + shipping to the price of a new part to make sure you’re making the best decision!

3) Verify that the used part has been cleaned and checked out to make sure it works properly. If you have your part installed on-site, you can be sure that everything is in good shape before you leave the yard!

Buying a second-hand part that still works is a great money-saving strategy for the thrifty consumer; there are significant savings to be had when you compare the cost of a brand new part to a salvaged part. But as with all things, it’s a good idea to do a little digging and make sure that buying a used part is what’s best for your car. If it is, then the savings you’ll receive from visiting an auto salvage yard will be well worth your time!